POS: Political Science Courses

College:Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities

Courses

POS 2041   American Politics

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

Deals with the constitutional principles on which the republic was founded, the evolution of institutions which emerged after 1789, and the development of processes and policies in response to 20th Century challenges and changes in the political culture. Meets General Education requirement in Social Sciences.

POS 3013   Career Development and Professional Standards in Social Science

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

This course focuses on preparing students for career success in industries employing social science majors. Crucial skills such as appropriate attire, conduct, portfolio construction, policy evaluation, and other general professional development abilities are emphasized. The first portion of the class reinforces academic writing standards in the Political Science/International Studies disciplines, where students learn appropriate citations, research standards, paper design, and other elements essential for success in upper division courses. The second portion of the class assesses each student?s individual strengths, weaknesses, and interests, offering improvements where appropriate. Students also learn how to market their unique skill sets, along with how to professionally brand themselves online. The instructor coordinates closely with Career Services for in-class visits and on-site visits to local employers.

POS 3033   Analyzing Issues in American Politics

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

From the education of our children to the safety of our airlines, those who make the laws affect each of our lives on a daily basis. Rarely, however, is the public aware of the process by which new ideas become law of the reasons why archaic policy solutions are left unchanged. A survey of contemporary issues in American politics such as energy and the environment, education, health care, welfare programs, crime and the economy. Throughout the semester, we will grapple with competing theories and competing methodologies for describing, analyzing, and evaluating what governments do in the political world in which we currently live.

POS 3235   Politics and Media

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

This course will study several major questions about the role of the media in society, and specifically in politics. Readings will address the media?s purpose in society as the fourth branch of government; ownership and regulation of the media; legal protections for free speech; and the process of news production. In addition, readings and class assignments will explore special topics related to the media. What is the history and future of the media in a changing technological environment? How are elections and public policy decisions impacted by the media? How does the media influence us individually? What are the effects of negativity in the media? How can one detect bias in the media, and how can one recover from its effects? Additionally, readings and assignments will explore the production of foreign affairs news coverage and its impact on voters.

POS 3270   Elections and Campaigning

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

This course is designed to introduce students of American politics to the practical side of campaigns and elections. The class will undertake an extensive examination of the local, state, and national elections to be held during the fall by focusing on candidates, parties, interest groups, and the media as well as some of the new influences in elections such as political consultants and pollsters. The focuses on the electoral process as well as the primary and general phases of American elections.

POS 3413   The Presidency

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

We begin our exploration of the American presidency with a critical overview of the constitutional parameters of the executive office. What did our founding fathers expect from an executive? From there we examine how the presidential institution has evolved since the founding. The presidency definitely has a somewhat different place now in our separated system of branches sharing power than it once did. One of the most important features we address is how individual presidents have impacted the scope and direction of the office. We highlight the important role of person style, leadership, persuasion, and charisma as an influence on American government as a whole. Finally, we evaluate competing theories of presidential power to see how useful they are in explaining contemporary presidential politics.

POS 3424   The Legislative Process

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)
Prerequisite: POS 2041

Politics of accommodation in formulating authoritative policies and general rules; emphasis on U.S. Congress and Florida Legislature in action; relations to other governmental processes.

POS 3453   Political Parties and Interest Groups

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)
Prerequisite: POS 2041

Political parties, nominations, campaigns, elections, voting behavior, political recruitment, party organization and parties as managers of government. Roles and functions of interest groups.

POS 3608   Constitutional Law: Federalism and Separation of Powers

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

Offers an introduction to the fundamental features of the Supreme Court and its Constitutional jurisprudence. In particular, students will examine through a case-study approach the evolution of judicial review, separation of powers, powers of the President and Congress, the evolution of federalism, the national commerce power, and national taxing and spending powers.

POS 3613   Constitutional Controversies

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

The American Founders established a Supreme Court to resolve all cases and controversies arising under the federal Constitution and its subsequent laws and treaties. This Court would serve primarily as an appellate tribunal, a court of last resort, reviewing and remanding, reversing or upholding the rulings of lower courts in both the federal and state judiciaries. In this course we will examine those elements of the appellate process on constitutional law, including the Court's review of petitions of certiorari, of merits briefs and the corresponding amici briefs and oral argument.

POS 3624   Constitutional Law: Individual Rights and Privileges

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

Offers an introduction to Supreme Court's role in the protection of individual rights, due process, and the equal protection of the laws. In particular, students will examine through a case study approach the evolution of the Court's jurisprudence in cases pertaining to civil rights and individual freedoms protected under the Constitution of the United States.

POS 3625   First Amendment Freedoms

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

Problem areas and doctrinal evolution in the judicial protection of First Amendment freedoms. Among specific subjects to be examined will be: free speech and press, free exercise of religion, state aid to religious schools, regulation of obscenity, freedom of association, and regulation of subversive activity.

POS 3734   Political Science Research Methods

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

Introduction to research methods in political science and the concepts associated with it. Surveys, polling, research design, sampling, data analysis and library research.

POS 4602   The Founders' Constitution

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

Analysis of the notes of the Constitutional Convention of 1787 and the alternative proposals for the organization of the National Government. Examination of the merits of arguments both for and against the adoption of the Constitution and the records of the creation and adoption of the Bill of Rights in the First Congress. This course is offered concurrently with POS 5637; graduate students will have additional work.

POS 4673   Jurisprudence

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

A survey of various approaches to theorizing about the Concept of Law. The Natural Law, Legal and Analytical Positivist, Sociological, Realist, and Critical Legal Studies approaches will be studied. In addition, concepts of Justice will be considered.

POS 4905   Directed Study

1-12 sh (may be repeated indefinitely for credit)

POS 4941   Internships

1-6 sh (may be repeated for up to 6 sh of credit)

Special "real-world" encounters programs designed for the individual student. Student must contact their advisor one semester in advance of desired date for internship. Graded on a satisfactory / unsatisfactory basis only. Permission is required.

POS 5637   The Founders' Constitution

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

Analysis of the notes of the Constitutional Convention of 1787 and the alternative proposals for the organization of the National Government. Examination of the merits of arguments both for and against the adoption of the Constitution and the records of the creation and adoption of the Bill of Rights in the First Congress. This course is offered concurrently with POS 4602; graduate students will have additional work.

POS 6006   The Study of Politics

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

Introduces the graduate study of political science. It concerns "scope" more than "method," and the range is broad, focusing on what political scientists do--teach, research, advise, and serve. Concerns embrace every conceivable level--local, regional, national, cultural, global, planetary.

POS 6045   Seminar in American Politics

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

Course content includes an overview of the institutions and processes of the American political system, the trend and tendencies of political behavior, and the diverse theoretical understandings of American government in the world of political science. Focus is on understanding and critically evaluating interpretations of the structure and function of our governmental system, including: the three branches of government, elections, political socialization and civic engagement,representation, political parties, and interest mobilization.

POS 6116   State and Local Government Principles and Practices

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

This course will focus on variation in the way state and local governments are designed to work and the way levels of government interact. We will begin by reviewing the powers granted to the states in the Constitution. We will compare state constitutions and look at their similarities and differences. We will take a detailed look at state governments, particularly state legislatures, governors, and state courts; and local governments and party organizations. We will also compare states and localities in the context of policy on education, health care, crime, and the environment.

POS 6704   Political Science Research Methods

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

Methods and logic of research in political science. POS 6704, Political Science Research Methods provides students with the knowledge and skills required to analyze and critique, as well as design, applied research in public policy and public affairs. The course introduces the student to the enterprise of academic research in these areas, provides the student with knowledge and understanding of the various philosophical and methodological approaches to applied research and allows the student to develop and hone analytical skills. Accepted social science research designs will be introduced and an analysis of threats to the validity and reliability of these different designs will be considered. Sampling theory and statistical analysis will be introduced.

POS 6905   Directed Study

1-12 sh (may be repeated indefinitely for credit)

POS 6940   Internship

2-6 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

The Department of Government encourages students to intern at governmental and non-profit agencies, as well as selected private-section firms, as an opportunity to gain practical experiences in a field of endeavor related to political science. In some instances, the internship could provide the intern with an opportunity for future employment. Although students are free to find their own internships, the Department will work with students in accomplishing this task. Eligibility requirements for an internship: 3.0 or higher GPA. Students should be enrolled in the Masters of Political Science Program, and have completed all core courses. Graded on satisfactory / unsatisfactory basis only. Permission is required.

POS 6971   Thesis

1-6 sh (may be repeated for up to 12 sh of credit)

Graded on satisfactory / unsatisfactory basis only. Permission is required.