INR: International Relations Courses

College:Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities

Courses

INR 2002   International Politics

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

Sources and processes of conflict and cooperation among nation-states. Meets General Education requirement in Social Sciences. Meets Multicultural Requirement.

INR 3073   Analyzing Issues in International Politics

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

This course examines several key contemporary issues in international politics. The course has both a theoretical and an applied component, with emphasis on readings to build concepts and empirical understanding combined with application through discussion and exercises designed to engage students in qualitative and quantitative analysis of these topics. For the applied component, the course approaches contemporary topics by employing the tools of political science research, including data interpretation in visual form such as charts and graphs, statistics, and models.

INR 3225   Vietnam and American Politics

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

The Vietnam War and its impact upon the political experience and social values of the United States.

INR 3503   Model United Nations

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

Students will learn the theory behind the founding, the history, the organization, and the parliamentary procedures of the United Nations. During in-class simulations, they learn to represent the University of West Florida at local or regional Model United Nations conferences, where they would be required to be "in-character," representing the views of their assigned country rather than their own. Requires extensive preparation and research.

INR 4060   Causes of War

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

This course will examine the causes and evolution of war. Drawing widely from new and established scholarship, it addresses several major topics: war's origins and evolution; theories about the causes and nature of war; arguments for a contemporary world of "new wars;" and theories about the future of war. Along the way, the course analyzes several very different international conflicts, World War I, the Cold War and the recent Iraq War. Specific issues addressed amidst these major themes include war and the state; structural and psychological explanations for war; terrorism and irregular war; and the moral/ethical dimensions of war.

INR 4102   American Foreign Policy

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

Americans seek to change the world and remain distinct from it. They energetically export their religious views, yet they officially support secularism. Americans denounce imperialism and coercion, yet they are accused of building a global empire and wielding astounding military power. And above all these tensions, Americans exert unparalleled influence and power in a globalized, increasingly democratic world that they helped create, yet they fret about relative decline and entertain plans for retrenchment and isolation. This course, therefore, seeks to analyze how Americans view and pursue their relationship with the world as well as the foundations and conduct of their foreign policy. It considers the institutions and offices, interests and political culture, and international challenges (including security, economic and humanitarian issues) that shape American foreign policy outcomes. To understand these influences, our readings, lecture and discussion will combine scholarly theories and policy perspectives. We will especially focus on debates regarding America's role as a global leader. Course is offered concurrently with INR 5105; graduate students will be assigned additional work.

INR 4124   Statecraft

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

This course introduces students to fundamental questions, theoretical arguments and concepts in the area of foreign policy analysis and decision making, otherwise known as Statecraft. The course examines core topics in statecraft such as deterrence (conventional and nuclear), coercive diplomacy, tools of coercion, and the ethics of using force. Throughout the course, students will also study several prominent cases. Course is offered concurrently with INR 5XX1; graduate students will be assigned additional work.

INR 4205   Spying: Fact and Fiction

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

Examination, in a seminar environment, of various aspects of espionage among major powers in the period 1915-2006. The primary focus of the course is on real-world human intelligence and counterintelligence activities of espionage agencies revealed in six novels. Coverage will be given to operations by German, French, British, Soviet, and U.S. human intelligence organizations supporting their nation's vital interests from World War I and II, the Cold War and in the modern era. Offered concurrently with INR 5206 (Spying: Fact and Fiction); graduate students will be assigned additional work.

INR 4224   War and Peace in East Asia

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

This course uses East Asian international history since the late 19th Century to explore some of the most enduring questions about international politics. What are the causes of war? How, once begun, do wars end? Why do some wars end in negotiated settlements while others continue until one side?s total defeat? How can states effectively communicate their intentions in spite of pervasive incentives to dissemble and prevaricate? When can alliances deter one?s enemies, and when might they draw states into undesirable conflicts? Finally, how do the most powerful states in the system -- the great powers -- manage the ever-shifting landscape of power between them? We begin the course in Part I by introducing two critical components of the modern theory of war?uncertainty and commitment problems?that shed light on both why wars start and how they end. Part II begins with the Sino-Japanese War of 1894-1895, which began a marked shift in power away from China and towards Japan, and ends with the collapse of the Japanese Empire at the end of the Second World War. Next, Part III explores the politics of the Cold War, which saw the consolidation of Communist China and the retreat of the Nationalist government to Taiwan at the end of the Chinese civil war and the United States? entry into the region as the status quo superpower during the Korean War. Finally, Part IV takes up questions of China?s emergence as an economic power, continuing frontier rivalries with Taiwan, Russia, and smaller neighbors, and the possibility of its emergence as a global power in the coming decades. This course will be offered concurrently with INR 5xx1 War and Peace in East Asia; graduate students will be given additional work.

INR 4314   Grand Strategy in International Relations

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

This course evaluates the historical, philosophical and scientific dimensions of grand strategy. As a topic, "grand strategy" refers to the link between a state's goals and capabilities. It is how states understand and pursue their perceived interests and roles in the world. Understanding grand strategies offers an essential tool to evaluate states' foreign policies as well as the international system in which they operate. The course works through several historical and contemporary case studies of great and mid-level powers, such as Russia, China and the United States. It considers grand strategy's institutional, cultural and external sources, and it apprises the normative or ethical goals of grand strategy. Throughout these case studies, students will also engage major theories, and they will interrogate key issues such as economic integration, nonproliferation, diplomatic agendas, conflict and cybersecurity. This course is offered concurrently with INR 5316; graduate students will have additional work.

INR 4334   National Security Policy

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

Definition of national values and threats to those values and their sources; design of appropriate measures to meet threats; methods for implementing these measures and the problems which inevitably arise over conflict between perceptions, values and actions. Applications of political violence and non-violence. Offered concurrently with INR 5330; graduate students will be assigned additional work.

INR 4364   Intelligence

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

Covers the origins, missions, functions, and responsibilities of the US security agencies as well as the relationship of the intelligence community providers, especially the Director of National Intelligence with key policy makers and overseers such as the President, National Security Council, the Congress, judiciary, media, and public opinion. Offered concurrently with INR 5365; graduate students will be assigned additional work.

INR 4403   International Law

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

Nature, history and trends of legal controls on international behavior; conflict between theory and practice; cases will be used to illustrate various points of law.

INR 4761   Religion and International Politics

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

This course analyzes how religious beliefs and institutions shape politics that cross borders. It draws upon an array of writings to examine major global phenomena like the religious roots of international order; religious challenges both to modern states and to recent globalization; and activism amongst global religious movements. In turn, the course concentrates on two major issues for scholars, policy- makers and citizens alike: 1) international religious extremism and violence and 2) religious influences on ? and targets of ? U.S. foreign policy. Examples of topics covered along the way include Evangelical activism and ideologies, religious terrorism and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. This course is offered concurrently with INR 5769; graduate students will have additional work.

INR 4905   Directed Study

1-12 sh (may be repeated indefinitely for credit)

INR 5065   Causes of War

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

This course will examine the causes and evolution of war. Drawing widely from new and established scholarship, it addresses several major topics: war?s origins and evolution; theories about the causes and nature of war; arguments for a contemporary world of ?new wars;? and theories about the future of war. Along the way, the course analyzes several very different international conflicts, World War I, the Cold War and the recent Iraq War. Specific issues addressed amidst these major themes include war and the state; structural and psychological explanations for war; terrorism and irregular war; and the moral/ethical dimensions of war. Offered concurrently with INR 4060; graduate students will have additional work.

INR 5105   American Foreign Policy

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

Americans seek to change the world and remain distinct from it. They energetically export their religious views, yet they officially support secularism. Americans denounce imperialism and coercion, yet they are accused of building a global empire and wielding astounding military power. And above all these tensions, Americans exert unparalleled influence and power in a globalized, increasingly democratic world that they helped create, yet they fret about relative decline and entertain plans for retrenchment and isolation. This course, therefore, seeks to analyze how Americans view and pursue their relationship with the world as well as the foundations and conduct of their foreign policy. It considers the institutions and offices, interests and political culture, and international challenges (including security, economic and humanitarian issues) that shape American foreign policy outcomes. To understand these influences, our readings, lecture and discussion will combine scholarly theories and policy perspectives. We will especially focus on debates regarding America's role as a global leader. Offered concurrently with INR 4102; graduate students will be assigned additional work.

INR 5129   Statecraft

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

This course introduces students to fundamental questions, theoretical arguments and concepts in the area of foreign policy analysis and decision making, otherwise known as Statecraft. The course examines core topics in statecraft such as deterrence (conventional and nuclear), coercive diplomacy, tools of coercion, and the ethics of using force. Throughout the course, students will also study several prominent cases. Course is offered concurrently with INR 4XX1; graduate students will be assigned additional work.

INR 5206   Spying: Fact and Fiction

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

Examination, in a seminar environment, of various aspects of espionage among major powers in the period 1915-2006. The primary focus of the course is on real-world human intelligence and counterintelligence activities of espionage agencies revealed in six novels. Coverage will be given to operations by German, French, British, Soviet, and U.S. human intelligence organizations supporting their nation's vital national interests from World War I and II, the Cold War and in the modern era. Offered concurrently with INR 4205 (Spying: Fact and Fiction); graduate students will be assigned additional work.

INR 5316   Grand Strategy in International Relations

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

This course evaluates the historical, philosophical and scientific dimensions of grand strategy. As a topic, grand strategy refers to the link between a state's goals and capabilities. It is how states understand and pursue their perceived interests and roles in the world. Understanding grand strategies offers an essential tool to evaluate states' foreign policies as well as the international system in which they operate. The course works through several historical and contemporary case studies of great and mid-level powers, such as Russia, China and the United States. It considers grand strategy's institutional, cultural and external sources, and it apprises the normative or ethical goals of grand strategy. Throughout these case studies, students will also engage major theories, and they will interrogate key issues such as economic integration, nonproliferation, diplomatic agendas, conflict and cybersecurity. This course is offered concurrently with INR 4314; graduate students will have additional work.

INR 5330   National Security Policy

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

Definition of national values and threats to those values and their sources; design of appropriate measures to meet threats; methods for implementing these measures and the problems which inevitably arise over conflict between perceptions, values and actions. Applications of political violence and non-violence. Offered concurrently with INR 4334; graduate students will be assigned additional work.

INR 5365   Intelligence

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

Covers the origins, mission, functions, and responsibilities of the US security agencies as well as the relationship of intelligence community providers, especially the Director of National Intelligence with key policy makers and overseers such as the President, National Security Council, the Congress, judiciary, media, and public opinion. Offered concurrently with INR 4364; graduate students will be assigned additional work.

INR 5547   War and Peace in East Asia

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

This course uses East Asian international history since the late 19th Century to explore some of the most enduring questions about international politics. What are the causes of war? How, once begun, do wars end? Why do some wars end in negotiated settlements while others continue until one side?s total defeat? How can states effectively communicate their intentions in spite of pervasive incentives to dissemble and prevaricate? When can alliances deter one?s enemies, and when might they draw states into undesirable conflicts? Finally, how do the most powerful states in the system -- the great powers -- manage the ever-shifting landscape of power between them? We begin the course in Part I by introducing two critical components of the modern theory of war?uncertainty and commitment problems?that shed light on both why wars start and how they end. Part II begins with the Sino-Japanese War of 1894-1895, which began a marked shift in power away from China and towards Japan, and ends with the collapse of the Japanese Empire at the end of the Second World War. Next, Part III explores the politics of the Cold War, which saw the consolidation of Communist China and the retreat of the Nationalist government to Taiwan at the end of the Chinese civil war and the United States? entry into the region as the status quo superpower during the Korean War. Finally, Part IV takes up questions of China?s emergence as an economic power, continuing frontier rivalries with Taiwan, Russia, and smaller neighbors, and the possibility of its emergence as a global power in the coming decades. This course will be offered concurrently with INR 4224 War and Peace in East Asia; graduate students will be given additional work.

INR 5769   Religion and International Politics

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

This course analyzes how religious beliefs and institutions shape politics that cross borders. It draws upon an array of writings to examine major global phenomena like the religious roots of international order; religious challenges both to modern states and to recent globalization; and activism amongst global religious movements. In turn, the course concentrates on two major issues for scholars, policy- makers and citizens alike: 1) international religious extremism and violence and 2) religious influences on ? and targets of ? U.S. foreign policy. Examples of topics covered along the way include Evangelical activism and ideologies, religious terrorism and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. This course is offered concurrently with INR 4761; graduate students will have additional work.

INR 6007   Seminar in International Relations

3 sh (may not be repeated for credit)

International Relations as a field study; theory, empirical data, historical development of the field.

INR 6905   Directed Study

1-12 sh (may be repeated indefinitely for credit)